Top Five Things to Do In: Seville, Spain

Just an hour east of Spain’s southwestern coast sits the city of Seville, the capital and largest city within the region of Andalusia. The city, situated along the River Guadalquivir, blends old and new with intricately designed architecture spanning centuries, lasting cultural traditions, and a thriving culinary scene. From the many museums to the must-see monuments, visitors are sure to enjoy their time in this enchanting city. Below are our top five “musts” in Seville to add to your list.

 

  1. Alcázarof Seville

The Alcázar, originally a Moorish fort, is the royal palace of Seville. The structure was registered as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1987, and is the oldest palace still in use in Europe. Spend your time marveling at the intricate detailing and gorgeous tile throughout the Alcázar – one of the most iconic structures in Seville.

  1. Maria Luisa Park

Maria Luisa Park, a public park stretching along the river, was formerly the gardens of the Palace of San Telmo. In preparation for the World’s Fair in 1929, the park was redeveloped and a variety of native and exotic plant species were planted throughout the grounds. With many monuments, fountains, and ponds scattered throughout the park, it is the perfect place to relax and enjoy the beauty of the city.

  1. Plaza de España

Once you’ve spent sufficient time strolling through the park, head out to explore the Plaza de España. Conveniently located along the park’s edge, the complex forms a large half-circle with buildings representing the four ancient kingdoms of Spain. The Plaza was initially built during the World’s Fair, although it now consists mainly of government buildings. With beautiful buildings designed in the Renaissance Revival style, the Plaza is very much worth a visit.

  1. El Rinconcillo

Established in 1670, El Rinconcillo is Seville’s oldest tapas bar. The historic local eatery, located in the city’s Macarena district, serves up a variety of dishes. With classic interiors and a cozy atmosphere, it’s no surprise that this family-owned restaurant has been a favorite for so long. Be sure to make a reservation as the place tends to fill up fast!

  1. Metropol Parasol

Metropol Parasol is a wooden structure located in Seville’s old quarter. Completed in 2011, the structure is new to the city, but has become an iconic piece of architecture. The structure is organized into four levels and houses a museum of Roman and Moorish remains, a market, a restaurant, and an open-air public plaza.

 

Interested in getting a taste of Seville? Check out World Endeavors study and intern programs on our website, or get in touch with a World Endeavors Advisor to hear more.

 

 

New Programs: Intern in Northern Ireland and Seville, Spain

On the heels of our Study Abroad at Heriot-Watt University announcement, comes the addition of two brand new internship program locations: Northern Ireland and Seville, Spain. We’ve offered study abroad programs in both locations for years, and we couldn’t be more excited to expand our opportunities. Read on to hear more about these new internship programs.

With a wide range of available internship fields, our Intern in Northern Ireland program offers something for everyone. In addition to internships in such fields as Criminal Justice, Interior Design, and Marketing, participants can also intern in the fields of Peace & Reconciliation, Human Rights, and Social Enterprise. Depending on their specific internship placement, participants may be based in Belfast, Derry, or other locations throughout Northern Ireland. Please visit our website to learn more about interning in Northern Ireland.

For students with an interest in expanding their knowledge of the Spanish language while gaining hands-on experience in their field, our intern program in Seville provides the perfect opportunity. The city is the economic, cultural, and political capital of Andalusia, and participants are sure to experience it all in beautiful Seville. Participants can choose from a range of internship fields including Visual Arts, Social Work, Event Management, and Media Studies. Please visit our website to learn more about interning in Seville.

Questions about our new programs? Visit our website or get in touch with a World Endeavors representative:

Intern in Seville, Spain: http://worldendeavors.com/programs/intern/intern-in-spain-seville

Intern in Northern Ireland: http://worldendeavors.com/programs/intern/intern-in-northern-ireland-multiple-locations

Phone: 612.729.3400

Email: info@worldendeavors.com

Dancing Around the World

Dancing is one of the many unique ways to express yourself and your culture.

Flamenco is a dance that originates from southern Spanish region of Andalucia and is well-known in Seville. This unique dance has been around for about 400 years and used to be a dance for the poor, which usually included the Gypsies, Moors, and Jews in the 16th century. Typically a woman dances, while a man plays the guitar and sings. Today the songs can either be dramatic and forceful to express a protest or dissatisfaction, or lighter to show happiness or a sense of humor.

Khon is one of the six traditional dances from Thailand, in which the dancers wear masks and elaborate costumes. The story told through dance is based on the Hindu Ramayana epics from India and is depicted as a drama as the performers act and dance. While they dance, a chorus sings to create a narrative for the audience to follow since the dancers cannot speak. Originally, only men were allowed to participate in the dance and it was held in a royal court, but now women are also an important part of the dance that now takes place on a stage. Some of the sets of characters: male, female, demons, celestial beings and monkeys.

In Brazil, the fast paced couples dance called Samba originates from the 16th century when Brazil was a colony of Portugal. The slaves that were brought over from Angola were told they couldn’t worship their own gods by their Christian Portuguese masters. After awhile, the Portuguese became suspicious of the slaves dances and tried to outlaw the parties where they gathered to dance. Today, Samba is a national symbol of Brazil, most common in the Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo region. It is a typical dance during Carnival and is well-known throughout the world. The music is typically composed with drums and guitar.

There are many unique dances around the world. So next time you travel, make sure you make some time in your agenda to see the dances live or even take a class.

Tourist, Student, or Work: Which Visa is Right for You?

The topic of visas (aka entry clearance) can be very confusing for the first-time traveler. And I’m not talking about credit cards! A ‘visa’ is a stamp or sticker that is placed in your passport by an immigration official of another country. World Endeavors’ participants mainly choose 1 of 3 kinds of visas:

Tourist visas

Student visas

Work visas

Tourist visas are usually the easiest and cheapest kind of visa to get. Most of the time, you simply arrive in a country (like Costa Rica or Ecuador) and the customs official stamps your passport as you get off the plane. The stamp is good for a certain amount of days – usually 21, 30, or 90 days. Many times the stamp can be renewed if you would like to visit for a longer amount of time. Some countries, like India, Brazil, Ghana, and Tanzania, require that US citizens get a tourist visa in advance. This usually involves filling out an application form, and sending it along with your passport and a fee to a consulate or Embassy. Yes, you do have to send them your passport in the mail! Don’t worry, they’ll send it back to you in a couple of weeks.

Student visas are required for most semester and year-long study abroad programs and some internship programs. Obtaining a student visa requires that you apply well in advance. Some countries, like Italy, Spain and France, require that you go to the consulate in person. Considering that the consulate for your area may not be right in your city, this is something to consider and plan for. Additionally, student visas may take a few weeks to process. You should start the process of obtaining your student visa as far in advance as possible. This might mean that you call the consulate to make an appointment 2 or more months before you plan to start your program. You may also need special paperwork in addition to your application form and passport, such as: original acceptance letters from a foreign university, a letter from your bank indicating sufficient funds, a round-trip flight itinerary, health insurance, and other documents. Please consult with a World Endeavors representative before you start your application for a student visa – we’ll help you get started!

Work visas allow individuals to obtain a job in a country of which they are not a citizen. Most tourist visas and student visas bar you from getting paid employment. Long-term or permanent work visas aren’t easy to get, and for some countries it is nearly impossible. However, some short-term (6 months – 1 year) work visa options are available to students or recent graduates. Check out programs like BUNAC for more information about getting a work visa. Work visas are required for World Endeavors’ Intern in England and Intern in Australia programs.

In short, visas can be complicated business, but all it takes is a little advance planning! For the best results, if you’re not sure what kind of visa you need for your World Endeavors program, just ask one of our friendly Enrollment Advisors (like me). We have lots of experience and we’re always ready to help.

World Endeavors Summer Photo Contest

Hello to all of our World Endeavors volunteers, interns, and students going abroad in spring/summer 2008!

We are excited to have participants in 16 countries this summer – Costa Rica, Ecuador, Brazil, Spain, Italy, England, Ghana, Thailand, China, Nepal, India, Guatemala, New Zealand, the Philippines, France, and Jamaica! With so many incredible people abroad doing so many incredible things, it would be a shame to not have a way for you to share all of your experiences with each other. And so…

I am excited to announce the first ever World Endeavors Summer Photo Contest! This contest will be a way for all of you to share what you’re up to, as well as to show off your photography skills. We will be collecting photos in 3 categories:
People – Photos of you, new friends, host families, people you work/volunteer/study with, etc.

Landscapes – These can be urban or natural – scenes from the cities, towns, and rural areas where you’re living and traveling.

Food – Who doesn’t love food pictures? I want to see typical meals from your countries, scenes from produce markets, and all of the crazy new things you’ve been brave enough to try (or at least brave enough to photograph!)

Email your pictures to us by July 10 (so you’ve got a few weeks to get out there and take some photos!). You don’t need to submit one for each category – just send in what you’ve got.

I will post all of the submissions right here on this blog, and then you will have a chance to vote for your favorites. The winning photos in each category will be featured on our website!

So if you’ve got some great pictures already, send them in, and if you’ve been shy with the camera so far, get out there and get some great shots! We can’t wait to see what you’ve got.